A few from the bookshelf

Help is out there – Literature and online resources

A few days ago I posted some resources to help you get through the UK lockdown titled Home isolation opportunities here are the followup details I promised.
You might be wondering where I am getting all these ideas on combating target panic or am I making it up as I go, based on a vivid imagination. Well no. I’m not that imaginative, just ask Sharon. She will tell you how I always struggle with Christmas and birthday present ideas.
The truth is there is a wealth of literature, along with hours of footage out there on archery of all forms and many of it addresses methods to control target panic.
Most of the techniques I mention initially come from a variety of sources, but have been tweaked or modified by myself. I do a lot of reading and reviewing of online material, along with active coaching of archers of all levels. I endeavour to learn from those experiences, trying different things, tweaking ideas for the individuals. Sometimes it works, other times it takes a while, but we get there eventually. For this reason, I would like to offer a list of resources that I have found useful over the years.

Literature

One very useful guide I’ve found which I’ve mentioned previously came recommended to me by another coach was “Instinctive archery insights” by Jay Kidwell. In the book, Jay who has a PhD in Psychology and is an archer the selves is offering a breakdown of how the human brain works with some very useful insights into practice techniques.
I’ve used versions of these techniques with several people, struggling with different manifestations of target panic or anxiety of shooting and found they work well. 
The Chimp Paradox by Dr Steve Peters may sound a strange choice as it has nothing to do with archery, but I have found the writings on the subject of mind management helpful. To put it simply it goes into detail of how we have two elements of our brain, the chimp brain and the computer brain. The key part is your chimp brain reacts faster, being more instinctive than the computer brain. The thing to remember is with work, you can program your computer brain which provides you with greater control. This is a really simplified definition of the book which doesn’t do it justice so please have a read as it can provide help when combating target panic.
Songi Woo an international archery coach mentioned using this book in a recent article in Bow International issue 138.
Bow international magazine tends to focus on more target elements of our hobby but it does produce some interesting articles on coaching advice and guidance.

Other sources are out there too

The Push ( https://www.thepusharchery.com/) podcasts have a wealth of knowledge and have run a series of podcasts on coaching advice and tips that provides a huge resource and can provide some great insights. You might recall I wrote a review of them a while back and I often go back to their coaching moments recordings.
Nusensei YouTube channel (youtube.com/channel/UC4IL0laJkpzH9JHmxNqjjMg) has some great material, though focused more on target archery it does offer some great advice and guidance applicable to all.
Joel Turner ( https://www.shotiq.com/) has done some fantastic work and offers loads of advice for archers. He has also produced a concept that offers great opportunities for archers in what he describes as open and closed-loop shooting. I’ll try and describe it in brief here.
Open-loop is when you have automatic movements or subconscious and does not have any time for feedback to stop or change the process
Closed-loop is when you make decision i.e choosing to move from one stage to another in your shot sequence, proving feedback so you can stop or adjust.
Archery 101 ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCl-LVJYEHvPXzVyrduIMtIg) is also worth checking out for ideas on improvements.
Over here in the UK, we have a few YouTubers who have been producing materials for years.
The cuddly bear fronting Archery Adventures known to many as “Grizzly Jim” ( https://www.grizzlyjim.co.uk/) has produced some really good videos over the years along with the odd articles in Bow international.
Though he’s been a bit quiet on the archery front over the last few years Wolfie Hughes has produced some great videos in the past. ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnkId_L6JEv0r_x1MzMvxfg)
Richard Head Longbows has been producing videos for years on different topics so check out their channel ( https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCr0ec0H7tNwfEEgoQ8qWoPQ)
I hope you find these of use, if you have any other resources you feel should be included then leave me a comment here or drop me a line.
Thanks for reading.
Coffee and good book

Literature review – How to survive by John Hudson

How to Survive: Lessons for Everyday Life from the Extreme World

How to Survive: Lessons for Everyday Life from the Extreme World

Okay so this isn’t an archery related book but I was curious about this book when I saw it advertised a few months back. I had been a fan of John Hudson after first seeing him a series called Survive That and then on an episode of Ed Stafford series: First man out. Nicknamed the Professor by his fellow presenters on Survive That. He comes across as a most capable individual who uses his very calm head to survive what ever situation he finds himself in.

John Hudson Bio image

I have to say the book was not a disappointment, as I found it a very easy read and strangely relaxing to read at times too. If you follow me on Instagram you might have seen me post about sitting under a tree with a cup of coffee reading the book, whilst waiting for a group of students to arrive for their archery lesson.
Unlike other survival books it is not technical or heavy in content on how to light a fire or build a shelter. Actually to be completely accurate the appendix at the back does give a great breakdown of how to plan and start a fire, with the second one detailing igloo construction. So there are some survival techniques.
Instead of focusing on techniques, it focuses on the mindset of the survivor. Nor is the books an autobiography of Johns life or a guide to survival technique which John is an expert, but something I think, no feel is potentially far more useful. It explores survival stories and at the end of each chapter summaries elements with the last chapters looking at how we can apply strategies to modern life.
I think because of this I found it a really good read and a book I have gone back to, to reread parts and chapters, which I think is what John intended when he wrote the book. I have found myself making notes from his summaries on more than one occasion. One of the things I quite like is his survival triangle Hope, Plan and Work.

Survival triangle

I feel he wants you to read it and reflect on the content, applying the knowledge. It has certainly made me think about things and how ideas might be applied.
For those interested here are the details. My copy is a hard back, I’m afraid I don’t know if a paper back version is out
Title: How to Survive: Lessons for Everyday Life from the Extreme World
Author: John Hudson
Hardcover: 304 pages
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN10: 1509833560
ISBN13: 978-1509833566
I think this is a great stocking filler or maybe a survival guide for the festive season, so well done Professor.
Thanks for reading.
PS the next article on Target Panic will be out in a couple of days I just wanted to get this out as I thought it might be a good Christmas present