Tip for when using your bow stringer

This is a quick tip which came about from a coaching session last weekend.
Saturday I was working with some new archers, who were very keen to try out their brand new bows. There is always something special about having you own bow, doubly so when it is your first one. They had bought bows, arrows, quivers everything they needed and were assembling the bows ready to hit the range. The only problem was their stringers kept slipping on the upper limbs.
This is something I have seen loads of times before and is a common problem especially if the bows are at all wet or the archer is less experienced in stringing bows. The archers put the stringer pocket on the lower limb and loop on the top one, go to stand on the loop and lift the bow. The problem is the loop on the upper limb slips down towards the centre of the bow.
Most stringers have a leather or rubber section in the upper loop to grip the bow limb, but I’ve noticed that they aren’t always that good. This is true of whether they are string or nylon webbing sort. Some just don’t offer that much of a grip to the bow, being either too small or smooth.
example of a webbing stringer

Example of a webbing stringer with a small stitched in pad

string or rope stringer pad

Example of a string or rope stringer pad which is pretty smooth

So this is where the tip comes in.
You can use a piece of something like slip-A-grip to go over the sewn in grip. You might recall I wrote an article on this stuff ages back title Don’t lose your grip for cheap arrow pullers etc. It is a open weave material with a rubber or plastic coating which offers the user greater traction. I use it a lot in my motorhome for the cupboard shelves to plates and stuff moving round. You can buy it from pound shops or any decent super market, I got mine from Lakeland.
Using this material offers a greater grip on the limb, so the stringer is less likely to slip when under tension as you string the bow. You still have to be careful and take your time but does help a bit.
example of a webbing stringer with grip fabric

example of a webbing stringer with grip fabric

I’ve used the same material to patch up an old stringer where the grips worn off as shown in the pictures below.

Old worn stringer

I then added some grip material, securing with some waxed string so doesn’t move. I’ve used this stringer for over 8 years and for 3 years with this material on it, so I know it works. It wears out after a while but is easy to replace and I find it gives me more confidence in using the stringer as I know it is unlikely to move or slip even in wet conditions.
stringer with grip

Same stringer with grip material

I hope you find this of use and thanks for reading.
Rob Shooting

Upcoming articles

Sorry guys, I have been a bit swamped with real life stuff recently and been neglecting this site and the followers / readers.

Just so you know I have a few articles in the pipeline and I thought I would give you a quick heads-up.

  • Inspired by some other archers and blogs I am going to be repairing some 3D targets the club recently purchased and are seeing signs of wear and tear. Along with reviewing the actual targets.

3D Repairs

  • I’ve been helping a few people recently with target panic so plan to put some of this material out there too for archers. Hopefully it will be of use and will be spread over a couple of posts.
  • A few months back I asked for the top 3 tips for improvements and top 3 newbie problems which is going to be split into a couple of articles one on problems one on improvements.
  • Since I shot the NFAS National Championships this year with a camera and not a bow I thought I might do a behind the scenes shoot report for it. You can see some of the photos on the NFAS website
  • I’m doing a lot of coaching at present so if readers would like something on this front let me know. There will probably be a review of the Core takedown recurve bow which we’ve been using.

I think that covers everything. Thanks for reading.