Hot-melt glue softening over gas ring

Top Tip when using Hot-Melt glue stick

I thought I would share a quick tip I’ve learnt from using Bohning Ferr-L-Tite Hot Melt Glue Stick.

Hot-Melt comes in a stick of approximately 3 inch / 75mm in length. You heat it up and as it melts you apply it to the arrows pile / point and then insert the point into or onto the shaft depending on the style of point, before the glue sets. It is pretty popular with many archers as due to the low melting point of the glue it is easy to warm it up and remove pile if required.

The problem is as you use the glue stick it gradually gets shorter and shorter, making it harder to hold over the flame. You normally end up holding the stub with a pair of pliers and run the risk of covering them in glue. To overcome this I can came up with a simple trick  of using a long wood screw that I screwed into one end of the glue stick stub to use this as a handle.

Hot-melt glue stub with a long wood screw attached

Hot-melt glue stub with a long wood screw attached

These kept my fingers away from the flame, allowing me to hold the glue securely, as opposed to having to use a pair of pliers. It is a simple tip and I’ve found it works well.

Hot-melt glue softening over gas ring

Hot-melt glue softening over gas ring

One other thing is make sure you don’t melt glue over your cooker as chances are if you do you’ll be in trouble.

I hope you find this of use and thanks for reading.

Me trying to remember to shoot

a quest for perfect form, couple of video views?

Just a quick note to say sorry there’s not been much from me recently. Long days at work sat in front of a computer screen means the last thing I want to do is boot up the computer when I get home. Added to this are shorter days which make it impossible to practice at night and weekends being spent with lots of work going on at the Briar Rose club’s new wood means I’m pretty busy.

Despite or maybe because of this I have had some time to review a couple of videos that have recently been posted on YouTube by a couple of archery channels, both talking about archery form,  Archery Adventures and NUSensei 

You can watch both below and make your own mind up about their perspectives. Both raise some interesting thoughts, accuracy and the concept of perfect form, in respect to the many different forms of archery from Olympic recurve shooters to the traditional archers.

 

 

Personally I’m not sure there is something which can be easily identified as perfect form. We do all shoot different bows, have different physical make up, etc. which can make the quest harder as you can’t just watch someone and be able to copy their style/ I know I don’t have anything near perfect form and I work on being able to be consistent with my shot execution. In contrast when I watch Sharon shoot she is incredibly consistent in draw technique and execution. Doing the basics right and repeating this in crucial.

Personally I think  everyone has the capability of developing good form, which will work for them. I know this is something that I try to encourage when I am coaching archers for improvements. But what works for one may not work for another, what works for me might or might not help you.

I think this is where we can spend some of the winter months reviewing material like these videos and thinking about developing ourselves.

I’ll leave you with one thought, maybe our quest should be for the execution of the perfect shot?

Thanks for reading and let me know what you think.

Sharons bow and arrow set up

Quick tip on brace height check

Showing the brace height and cresting

Showing the brace height and cresting

We all know how important it is to have your bow setup right and ensure it is at the correct brace height. I wanted to offer a quick tip to all archers out there for checking your brace height on your bow, which doesn’t involve having a rule.

When I made up the last batch of arrows for Sharon, I crested them in colours to match her fletchings, are pink and orange.

Close up of a couple of finished arrows

Close up of a couple of finished arrows

Before I started I measured the brace height for her bow and made sure that where the two colours met on the arrow, it would be in line with the light coloured strip on her bow, when at the correct brace height.

I then edged the divide between the two colours with a black band.

One of Sharons' finished arrows with black edging

One of Sharons’ finished arrows with black edging

Since this band coincides with the white band on her the bow riser, when the bow is at the correct brace height. It means she has simply to nock an arrows and check the banding on the arrows matches up with the light stripe on her bow and she will know her brace height is correct.

Sharons bow and arrow set up

Sharons bow and arrow set up

It is a simple and quick method that does not need a bracing rule, just a little bit of preparation when making your arrows. You could easily adapt the idea with any arrows, by putting a mark on the arrow to coincide with the correct brace height.

I hope this helps and thanks for reading.