Arrow making tips and advice

 

Okay so as many of you know I make a lot of arrows and if truith be known I quite like it. I find the process of making them relaxing a lot of the time. The thing is I tend to make wooden arrows and not many with aluminium or carbon shafts these days since Sharon swapped back from shooting barebow to shooting woods.

Well I’ve been making up some club training arrows in readiness for some new courses we are running in January. They are Mybow Cadets from Merlin Archery and I’ll be posting a review of the arrows in a few months, but in the meantime I thought I’d share this tip. It was one given to me by Steve a fellow Briar Rose club member who is very experienced in shooting barebow and making up such arrows.

When making them I noticed the nock tends to rotate in the shaft, making it a bit tricky at times when mounting them on the fletching jig. Now you could add a drop of glue to secure them, but Steve suggested using cling film. Yes, the stuff that normally covers your supermarket produce.

If you wrap the end of the nock that fits into the shaft with a little film and then insert the nock it provides a tighter fit whilst still allowing some movement for alignment purposes.

The amount required varies but with a little trial and error I found a length of 5 to 6 cm and about 12 mm wide worked best. Wrapped tightly round the end that fits in the shaft and it seems to work pretty well.

Well I hope this helps, let me know how it works for you or if you have any other advice or such fixes. My thanks to Steve for the tip.

Thanks for reading.

New Year so resolve to help and keep learning

We are a little over a week into 2019 already and I wonder how many of you made one or more New Year resolutions, whether to get more exercise, eat healthier or just shoot more. Have managed to stick with them so far?

A few people have asked about New Year resolutions and if I have any. Well no I don’t have. My thinking is if it is important enough to you to change, then why wait for the the New Year?

Having said this if you do like New Year resolutions then I would like to offer one though for you to consider.

Your archery journey doesn’t end after your beginners course is completed or when you think you have worked out how to shoot. This is in reality the start of your archery journey. Much like when you pass your driving test and get behind the wheel on your own for the first time, that is when you really start to drive. That is when you learn to cope with the situations.

So many new archers forget this, the fact you are still learning and developing your skills. I’ve been lucky enough to have been shooting for about 10 years now and I am still learning new things, experimenting with new techniques, reading new coaching theories, testing equipment.

So I suggest you keep learning, keeping watching the YouTube videos, listening to archery podcasts, reading archery books & articles, speaking to other archers & of course there are your coaches who will be more than willing to help.
Why not get more involved with your club, offer your help, maybe they need help with with setting up the club range or targets on the course. Clearing woodland for a 3D shot or maybe you have computer skills and could update the clubs website.
Never stop learning or helping others, let those be your targets for 2019.

Happy New year everyone.

Thanks for reading.