Different day at work

Different day at work

Different day at work

Bit of a different day at work one day this week.

Every year an event is run at the university I work for, where staff members are encouraged to demonstrate or promote their hobbies and interests, whether this be cooking, painting etc.

Most of the stalls are housed in one large lecturing room, with a couple of other breakout rooms.

The session runs for a couple of hours over the lunch time and there were people with stands full of homemade cakes, another one on how you can get involved with girl guides organisation. One very popular stall was a sushi stand, where they were letting people have a go at making their own sushi. In other rooms there were sessions on BMI health checks and massages for those feeling stressed? The event is all about staff well being and what the institution can do to promote well being and what staff do themselves.

I had a stall on archery (surprise, surprise), and though I couldn’t bring in any of my bows, I was able to show a selection of arrows, along with fletching set ups and a variety of literature. In hindsight I think I should have printed off some large pictures but I didn’t know I would have had a display board.

Archery stall

Archery stall

I think there were nearly 200 people booked to attend and many more that were just passing by, or maybe they were just after the free lunch provided by the organisers if you booked in advance.  It did feel busy at times, though I think that might have been helped by being near the sushi stall.

What was interesting when talking with a few people were the number who said they’d tried archery at Centre parks or other such holiday camps and really enjoyed it. Makes you wonder if the archery community should try and promote the hobby more?

Thanks for reading.

 

Removing broken wood tip from inside pile

Thought those of you, who like me shoot wooden arrows and sometimes have the misfortune to break the pile off might find this a useful tip. No pun intended.

Quite often I find my arrows break directly behind the pile, leaving a small piece of wood inside the pile which can be difficult to remove especially if you want to reuse the pile.
I know some people drill the wood out and others simply throw away the pile.
Well I thought I would show how I remove the broken piece of wood.

Tools required

Tools required

The tools required are
1 x long wood screw 2 1/2″ is ideal (cross head)
1 x screwdriver
1 x gas stove or gas ring
1-2 x pliers
1 x small pot or basin of water
Step 1
First stage is to carefully take the screw and screw it into the wood still in the pile.
Screw into wood

Screw into wood

Step 2 
Once the screw is secured in the wood, you need to heat the pile up as this breaks down the glue securing the wood to the pile.
Holding it by the screw you can heat the pile using the gas ring. It should only take 10-20 seconds.
Word of warning here. 
I usually use screw on piles, but if you have taper fit or parrell fit you can have the piles pop off as the glue and gases in the glue expand under the heat.
The reason I mention this is on one occasion when removing a pile I left it in the ring to heat up too long as I worked on another. I heard a loud pop and saw the pile shoot across the kitchen towards the window and the screw and wood went in another direction. Fortunately no one was  injured and nothing was broken (otherwise I think Sharon might have injured me)
Heating the pile

Heating the pile

The other thing to be careful of is to not let the wood burn as this will not only smoke the kitchen out possibly triggering a smoke detector but also make it harder to remove the wood.
It’s worth doing this in a well ventilated room as the glue can stinks, especially the two part epoxy I use. How long you keep it in the flame will vary depending on the glue. Hot melt, melts quickly whilst some epoxy ones might take 20 seconds. It’s a bit of trial and error here.

Step 3
Holding the now heated pile  in the pliers (don’t grab it with your hand as it will be hot) take the screw driver and continue to screw the screw into the wood.
You should find that because the glue has melted and lost adhesion to the pile the screw will force the wood free. Resulting in the wood remaining on the screw and free of the pile.

Wood remains on pile

Wood remains on pile

Step 4 
Drop the pile and screw into a pot of cold water to cool.  Once cool you can dry the pile.
You might need to clean out the inside of the pile of glue residue with a bit of wire wool or I find an old shaft tapered down and screwed in and out a couple of times works well to dislodge any residue.
The easiest way to remove the wood from the screw is to hold the wood in the pliers and then using the screw driver “unscrew” it.
Hope you find this useful.
Thanks for reading.